Mix-and-Match Training Menu

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Aerobic Dancing   |   Bicycling   |    Running   |   Stair Climbing   |   Stationary Bicycling   |   Swimming   |   Tennis Racquetball   |   Walking   |   Weight Training   |   Yoga

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Aerobic Dancing / Step Aerobics (low to high-impact)

Body Benefits

Low-Impact or Non-Impact Aerobics

Excellent for cardiovascular health and overall body toning.

Training Key

Find an instructor who works in a style and tempo you feel comfortable with.

Caution

High-impact aerobics can strain the knees, hips and ankles. Step aerobics is lower-impact but should be avoided by anyone with knee problems.

Bicycling (low-impact)

Body Benefits

Excellent for aerobic endurance and weight control. Develops strong legs and thighs without pounding the feet, knees and ankles.

Training Key

Find riding partners to reduce wind resistance; learn to maintain a high pedal tempo (80 to 100 revolutions per minute)

Caution

Beginners should learn hand signals and rules of the road and should ride in a traffic-free setting.  Local cycling clubs offer courses on proper signaling and road etiquette.

Running (high-impact)

Body Benefits

Excellent for leg strength, aerobic fitness and weight control.

Training Key

Run at a pace that feels comfortable to you and walk should you feel the need. Whenever possible, seek out a soft training surface such as grass, dirt or a running track.

Caution

If you feel any aches or pain in your hips, knees, legs, feet or ankles, stop immediately and take several days off before resuming. If the pain lasts more than a week, see a doctor.

Stair Climbing (low-impact)

Body Benefits

Excellent for aerobic fitness, leg and buttock strength and overall toning.

Training Key

Short, quick steps work best.

Caution

Over striding can strain your knees.

Stationary Bicycling (low-impact)

Body Benefits

Excellent for cardiovascular fitness, weight control and leg strength. Because it develops the quadriceps, it’s a good complement to running.

Training Key

Varying the effort helps combat boredom. Use bikes with computerized workouts to add interest to the session.

Caution

The exercise bike is most effective when supplemented with other activities.

Swimming (low-impact)

Body Benefits

Excellent for developing arms and shoulders and great for aerobic endurance. Also good for overall flexibility and fair for weight control. Reduces stress, too.

Training Key

Vary your stroke to keep interest. It’s only aerobic if you don’t stop.

Caution

Swimming skills take time to perfect. If yours are rusty, start off with a few lessons. Novice swimmers should always swim with a partner or under a lifeguard’s supervision.

Tennis Racquetball (medium-impact)

Body Benefits

Excellent for eye-hand coordination, balance and leg and arm toning. Moderately good for aerobic fitness and weight loss.

Training Key

Work on developing a smooth, consistent swing. Lessons will help your game improve more rapidly.

Caution

Wear shoes with good lateral support to prevent foot and ankle injuries.

Walking (medium-impact)

Body Benefits

Good for leg strength and cardiovascular health.

Training Key

Pump your arms faster and your legs will follow suit. Try to fit walking into your daily routine. Find a friend to walk with you.

Caution

Make sure your shoes fit and are broken in before taking long walks.

Weight Training (medium-impact)

Body Benefits

Excellent for overall muscle, tendon and bone strength; mildly beneficial for the heart. Done properly, weight training can improve your performance in virtually any sport.

Training Key

Do between 8 and 12 repetitions of each exercise.

Caution

Don’t overdo it! If you use barbells, always have a friend spot you. Take at least 1 day to recover between weight-training sessions.

Yoga (low-impact)

Body Benefits

Excellent for flexibility, relaxation and stress reduction.

Training Key

Find a good instructor who can modify yoga to suit your individual needs rather than someone who insists on “classical” yoga positions.

Caution

Don’t push. Develop your skills slowly and yoga will give you a lifetime of satisfaction.

This website is not meant to substitute for expert medical advice or treatment. Follow your doctor’s or health care provider’s advice if it differs from what is given in this guide.

 

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